Chaitanya's Random Pages

February 29, 2012

Expensive bowling in ODIs

Filed under: cricket,sport — ckrao @ 8:39 pm

Fascinating that just a few days after I blogged about economical bowling performances in cricket ODIs, we see the most expensive analysis in terms of economy rate (qualification: 5 overs or more). I found about it at Andy Zaltzman’s twitter feed here.

The list of expensive analyses can be found here. Earlier in the month a bowler (Brian Vitori of Zimbabwe) had conceded 100+ runs for only the fourth time in an ODI (9-0-105-1 against New Zealand at Napier).

Lasith Malinga bowled 7.4 overs for 96 runs (and one wicket) as India managed to chase down a victory target of 321 in just 36.4 overs. It was the fifth highest run rate for a 300+ score according to this.

Here is Malinga’s ball-by-ball breakdown. After 14 balls he had only conceded 13, then he conceded 83 off his next 32 balls!

1 1 1 0 0 2 | 1 2 1 0 4 0 | 0 0 4 1 4 6 | 4 x 2W 0 4 1 4 | 4 1 0 4 1 W 4lb | 1 1 4 1 1 0 | 2 6 4 4 4 4 | 1 1 4 4

(W = wide, x = wicket, lb = legbye)

For economical analyses I pointed out those that happened in recent times. The following lists the most expensive analyses that occurred prior to 2000.

  • Saurav Ganguly (India) bowled 5 overs for 62 against Pakistan at Toronto in 1998.
  • Rajab Ali (Kenya) bowled 6 overs for 67 against SL at Kandy in 1996 as SL posted a massive score of 5/398 (the highest at the time) in the World Cup.
  • Ravi Shastri (India) bowled 7 overs for 77 against the West Indies at Jamshedpur in 1983. Viv Richards scored 149 off 99 balls in the game.
  • Greg Matthews (Australia) bowled 5 overs for 54 against India at Delhi in 1986.
  • Heath Davis (New Zealand) bowled 5 overs for 54 against India at Bangalore in 1997.
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